CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

MUSIC IN LOS ANGELES, 1860-1900

A thesis submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in

Special Major

by

Jeannie G. Pool

January 1987




CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ABSTRACT

CHAPTER I:OVERVIEW: FROM COW TOWN BALLADS TO BIG CITY MUSICAL LIFE 1
CHAPTER II:CONCERT HALLS AND OTHER PERFORMANCE SITES 8
CHAPTER III:LOCAL MUSICIANS 34
CHAPTER IV:MUSIC IN CHURCHES
CHAPTER V:MUSIC PERFORMING ORGANIZATIONS INCLUDING
BANDS, ORCHESTRAS AND CHORAL SOCIETIES 56
CHAPTER VI:MUSIC MERCHANTS AND IMPRESARIOS 7
CHAPTER VII:VISITING CELEBRITIES 93
CHAPTER VIII:MUSIC EDUCATION
CONCLUSION:112
BIBLIOGRAPHY:117

ABSTRACT

MUSIC IN LOS ANGELES, 1860-1900

by

Jeannie G. Pool
Master of Arts in Special Major

Los Angeles has a rich musical heritage in the European concert music tradition, beginning in the 1860s. Concert halls were built, concerts given, musical clubs and organizations formed, music schools founded, and musicians from all over the world settled here, bringing their music and musical instruments with them.

This thesis explores the development of Los Angeles' musical heritage through an examination of primary and secondary sources on music and on Los Angeles history. Primary sources include memoirs, newspapers, city directories, contemporary biographical dictionaries, concert programs, and photographs. Secondary sources include one book and a few articles. Research has been conducted with materials available in the Huntington Library, the Library of California State University, Northridge and the Music Library of the University of California, Los Angeles, and rare materials in the hands of a private collector, Mr. Lance Bowling.

Los Angeles in 1860 was a cow town with a few traveling minstrel troupes and a couple of local part-time musicians providing what little entertainment there was. By the end of the century, Los Angeles had blossomed into a metropolitan city with operas, symphonies, chamber music and other musical extravaganzas presented throughout the year by an accomplished and committed group of local musicians, and by the most prestigious and world-class ensembles who were willing and eager to perform here. By the end of nineteenth century, a cultured music tradition was well established, providing a firm foundation for the rich, diverse and abundant musical life which unfolds during the first decades of the next century.